Difference between revisions of "Include and exclude rules"

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__NOTOC__
{{Greasemonkey Manual TOC}}
[[User script]]s specify include and exclude rules in the [[metadata block]].
[[User script]]s specify include and exclude rules in the [[metadata block]].


'''The script will execute if it matches any include rule, as long as it does not match an exclude rule.'''
'''The script will execute if it matches any include rule, as long as it does not match an exclude rule.'''


The rules are URLs, which can have a "wildcard" asterisk (*), which matches any string including the empty string. For example: <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/*</nowiki></code> will match <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/bar</nowiki></code> and <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/</nowiki></code>, but not <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/baz/</nowiki></code>. A rule can have several wildcards or none, in which case the rule must match the entire URL exactly. Exclude rules look the same, and prevent the script from being executed. An example:
'''Please note: The <code>@match</code> rule is safer than the older <code>@include</code> rule, and now widely supported, so you are recommended to use that instead.  [https://wiki.greasespot.net/Metadata_Block#.40match Read about the <code>@match</code> rule here].
 
== Globs ==
 
Include and exclude rules support the <code>*</code> or [[wikipedia:Glob (programming)|globbing operator]].
The <code>*</code> serves as a wildcard that matches one or more of any character.
A rule can have several wildcards or none, in which case the rule must match the entire URL exactly.
Exclude rules look the same, and prevent the script from being executed.
 
For example: <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/*</nowiki></code> will match:
 
* <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/bar</nowiki></code> and,
* <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/</nowiki></code>
 
but not:
 
* <code><nowiki>http://www.example.com/baz/</nowiki></code>.
 
Further examples:
 
<pre class="sample">
// ==UserScript==
// @include    <nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/*</nowiki>
// @include    <nowiki>http://www.example.org/*.bar</nowiki>
// @exclude    <nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/baz</nowiki>
// ==/UserScript==
</pre>
 
If no include rule is provided, <code>@include *</code> is assumed.
That is: every URL will be matched, within the allowed [[#Greaseable_schemes|Greaseable schemes]].


// ==UserScript==
== Regular Expressions ==
// @include    <nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/*</nowiki>
// @include    <nowiki>http://www.example.org/*.bar</nowiki>
// @exclude    <nowiki>http://www.example.com/foo/baz</nowiki>
// ==/UserScript==


If no include rule is provided, <code>@include *</code> is assumed. That is, every URL will be matched.
Support for full regular expressions in include and exclude rules is also available.
If the rule both starts and ends with a forward-slash (<code>/</code>) character, the contents inside those slashes are interpreted as a regular expression.
For example:


[[#top |top]]
<pre class="sample">
// ==UserScript==
// @include    <nowiki>/^https?://www\.example\.com/.*$/</nowiki>
// @include    <nowiki>/^http://www\.example\.(org|net)//</nowiki>
// ==/UserScript==
</pre>


== Schemes ==
Note:
* The rule is parsed as a standard javascript <code>new RegExp()</code>, so you do not need to escape forward slashes inside the rule.  Special regex characters (like <code>.</code>) '''should''' still be escaped, as in the above examples; otherwise they have their normal regex meaning (like <code>.</code> matching any non-newline character).
* The rule is always treated as case insensitive.
* Anchors (<code>^</code>, <code>$</code>) are not supplied for you.  If desired, they should be used as in the above example.


=== http: ===
== Greaseable schemes ==
=== https: ===
=== ftp: ===
=== data: ===
=== file: ===


[[#top |top]]
Greasemonkey will run scripts only on documents loaded from particular [http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-3.1 schemes].
By default, those are:


=== about: ===
* http
* https
* about:blank


[[#top |top]]
User scripts will not run on documents from any other scheme (ftp, file, etc.) or any other part of about.


<!-- Not in 4.0
== Magic TLD ==
== Magic TLD ==


The only special syntax besides the wildcard is .tld. An include such as <code><nowiki>http://www.example.tld/*</nowiki></code> will match any top level domain, such as <code>www.example.com</code>, <code>www.example.org</code>, <code>www.example.co.uk</code>, and so on. One must be careful with this, to not accidentally leak data to a site that they did not mean to match. This list of TLDs includes a myriad of dual-segment TLDs (such as ca.us, aeroport.fr and kyoto.jp), beside the plain country or category codes (com, jp, se).  For a full list see the [[Magic TLD]] page.
The only special syntax besides the wildcard is .tld. An include such as <code><nowiki>http://www.example.tld/*</nowiki></code> will match any top level domain, such as <code>www.example.com</code>, <code>www.example.org</code>, <code>www.example.co.uk</code>, and so on. One must be careful with this, to not accidentally leak data to a site that they did not mean to match. This list of TLDs includes myriad dual-segment TLDs (such as ca.us, aeroport.fr and kyoto.jp), beside the plain country or category codes (com, jp, se).  For a full list see the [[Magic TLD]] page.
 
-->
<!-- Not in 4.0
== User Specified Rules ==
 
Since Greasemonkey [[Version history#0.9.9|0.9.9]], users have been able to specify their own exclude and include values through the script options dialog in the Add Ons Manager.
Thus, each script has its own rules plus optionally the user's rules.


[[#top |top]]
The user's rules are checked first, then the script's rules are checked.
If any exclude matches the page, the script does not run.
If any include matches the page, the script will run.
If a script include matches, but a user exclude also matches, the user exclude will take precedence over the script, and it will not run.
If a script exclude matches, but a user include also matches, the user include will take precedence over the script, and it will run.
-->

Latest revision as of 06:47, 13 March 2018

User scripts specify include and exclude rules in the metadata block.

The script will execute if it matches any include rule, as long as it does not match an exclude rule.

Please note: The @match rule is safer than the older @include rule, and now widely supported, so you are recommended to use that instead. Read about the @match rule here.

Globs

Include and exclude rules support the * or globbing operator. The * serves as a wildcard that matches one or more of any character. A rule can have several wildcards or none, in which case the rule must match the entire URL exactly. Exclude rules look the same, and prevent the script from being executed.

For example: http://www.example.com/foo/* will match:

  • http://www.example.com/foo/bar and,
  • http://www.example.com/foo/

but not:

  • http://www.example.com/baz/.

Further examples:

// ==UserScript==
// @include     http://www.example.com/foo/*
// @include     http://www.example.org/*.bar
// @exclude     http://www.example.com/foo/baz
// ==/UserScript==

If no include rule is provided, @include * is assumed. That is: every URL will be matched, within the allowed Greaseable schemes.

Regular Expressions

Support for full regular expressions in include and exclude rules is also available. If the rule both starts and ends with a forward-slash (/) character, the contents inside those slashes are interpreted as a regular expression. For example:

// ==UserScript==
// @include     /^https?://www\.example\.com/.*$/
// @include     /^http://www\.example\.(org|net)//
// ==/UserScript==

Note:

  • The rule is parsed as a standard javascript new RegExp(), so you do not need to escape forward slashes inside the rule. Special regex characters (like .) should still be escaped, as in the above examples; otherwise they have their normal regex meaning (like . matching any non-newline character).
  • The rule is always treated as case insensitive.
  • Anchors (^, $) are not supplied for you. If desired, they should be used as in the above example.

Greaseable schemes

Greasemonkey will run scripts only on documents loaded from particular schemes. By default, those are:

  • http
  • https
  • about:blank

User scripts will not run on documents from any other scheme (ftp, file, etc.) or any other part of about.